Repairing this World is Our Obligation

Rabbi's Message - November 9, 2021

Rabbi Karen Bodney-Halasz

In Pirkei Avot, Rabbi Tarfon taught: Lo alecha ha’melacha ligmor, v’lo ata ben horin l’hibatel mi’mena. It is not our obligation to complete the work, but nor are we free to refrain from doing it.  

As Jews, we are not permitted to back down from confronting the ills of our community.  We are taught that we must take an active role in finding solutions to bring us closer to the world as it should be.  It is a big weight to bear, considering the enormity of the work to be done, but we are not to be disheartened.  Even if our efforts may not single-handedly fix all of our societal ills, we must remain committed.  We must continue to engage in acts of tzedakah, justice, ma’asim tovim, good deeds, and Tikkun Olam, mending the world. 

Sometimes the work can be discouraging.  There will be moments in our lives when we struggle with the efficacy of our impact.  It could be because of the magnitude of the work to be done or a lack of capacity for effecting change.  But we are comforted knowing that even the smallest of our efforts will make a difference.  When we drop off a bag of dry goods at a food drive, we understand that, although the handful of items we contribute will not eliminate hunger in our entire population, it will nourish the bodies of individual families.  And every ripple we produce through our efforts has the possibility to become a massive change-enacting wave.   

When it comes to systemic issues in our society, these also can feel like climbing insurmountable mountains.  Documents, interactions, personal experiences, and testimonies - they help us understand the depth of the problems our society faces.  And it, too, is a lot.  But, just like our hands-on work of tzedakah, we must keep at it, even if we don’t see the immediate results of our work.  Policy change often takes years.  And we are not free to refrain from the work, just because we may not be able to finish it in our lifetimes.

This is why the work of the Religious Action Center is so important to our congregations.  It offers us a mouthpiece to address larger societal issues as a community and helps us to feel supported in our individual efforts.  

This year, the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC) has committed itself to issues surrounding racial justice.  Here in Ohio, we are specifically addressing one of many of these issues, in particular, the death penalty.  We are working closely with Ohioans to Stop Executions (OTSE) to help pass bills that will abolish the death penalty in our state.  With RAC-OH, our congregations are empowered to work in coalition to bring about real, lasting change in our communities.  And together, our ripples will gain incredible force.

On Thursday, you have the opportunity to hear from a powerful panel of speakers to learn more about why we are being called to abolish the death penalty.  Wise Temple is hosting an evening (via Zoom) to hear from State Representative Jean Schmidt, founder of the OTSE Hannah Kubbins, and Jonathan Mann, a family member of a victim.  Following this panel there will be time for us to discuss how we can move forward together as a congregation.  I hope that you will join me for this meaningful conversation.  When we work together, we help carry the weight of this task more evenly and move closer to a world of wholeness and peace.

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